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Elmer T. Herzog, Jeweler – Jewelry-Watches – 806 Madison Avenue – Covington, KY

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

To understand Herzog Jewelers today, it’s important to take a look at Herzog Jewelers from the beginning.

Let’s go back to 1922, when phones had been around for less than 50 years and flappers were bobbing their hair. In that year, our founder, Elmer T. Herzog, opened up a small jewelry store at 806 Madison Avenue in Covington, Kentucky. While working long hours serving his customers (something we can all relate to even today), he earned a reputation as a solid community member and trustworthy jeweler. And to think—he did all of this without a smart phone, call waiting or a laptop!

Fast-forward to 1980, when cell phones were the size of infants and hair was even bigger. It was in this year that Elmer retired and his son-in-law, Joseph Koester, Jr., took over.  – Herzog Jewelers dot com

Like most urban stories, demographics change and so do locations for services to follow their market.

Hub Discount Department Stores – West Market – Louisville, KY

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Gordon’s Gin – Regency Liquors – The Half Note Club – Chattanooga, TN

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

502 E MLK Blvd © Frank H. Jump

This awning was full of mold an inch deep and the smell coming out of the building of both the Half Note Club and Regency Liquors indicated they were closed for a number of years.

For decades, Ninth Street was the hub of the black community, home to black-owned retail shops, nightclubs and businesses. Bessie Smith sang there as a child and teenager, and it attracted many of biggest black entertainers such as Ella Fitzgerald, Lena Horne and Nat “King” Cole, who would stay in the Martin Hotel. Clubs like the Whole Note and The Half Note were full of blues and jazz.

East Ninth Street was renamed M.L King Boulevard in 1981. – Chattanooga Now, March 2014

According to a thread in Old Bars, Chattanooga;

The Whole Note started out as a top of the line club for R&B entertainment and the Half Note was private for the who’s who’s in African American businessmen and politicians. Charles Bryant was the owner.

Coffee Printing Company – Selma, AL

© Frank H. Jump

Bull Durham Tobacco – Uneeda Biscuit – Nabisco – Sloan’s Liniment, etc. – Birmingham, AL

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Dixie Cycle & Toy Co. – Bicycles, Toys, Lawnmower Supplies – Cook Credit Furniture © Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Sloan’s © Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Also featured in Charles Buchanan’s Fading Ads of Birmingham (History Press, 2012.

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Frank Jump, Charles Buchanan & Vincenzo Aiosa – Birmingham, AL – July 2015

Central Alabama Dry Goods Co. – Selma, AL

© Frank H. Jump

W.S. Monk – Bulletin of the National Association of Credit Men – May 1914 – Google Books

Cigars – Tobacco – Whole Ground Spices – 620 East Market – Louisville, KY

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Laclede’s Landing – Waterfront Art – Missouri Arts Council

CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE © Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

 

Sealtest – Coca-Cola – Drugs – Pharmacy – Chattanooga, TN

© Frank H. Jump

Vintage 1950s porcelain enamel sign – CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE

© Frank H. Jump

Wink – The Sassy One – Canada Dry – Sun Hotel – South Scranton, PA

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Six weeks since the Sun went down, Scranton police Officer Jill Foley drove her cruiser through a silent South Side on patrol Wednesday night looking for some sign, any sign of crime. – Denis J. O’Malley – Times Tribune, July 3, 2011

Today, I was also looking for a sign on Cedar Avenue. I found several. Not the kind of signs for which Officer Jill Foley was looking. Apparently, this once bustling late-19th-century neighborhood is now safer and quieter since this hotel has closed. Reviews on Google for this hotel are hilarious.

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The guy in the front with the Harley-Davidson claims to have done the lettering on this sign “too many years ago to remember when.” Within one block, there were many signs of a previous life on Cedar Avenue that was not so nefarious and sleazy. The South Side, as it is called in Scranton, can use a comeback. But then again, so can the North Side and the Middle Side. Scranton has some great architectural and advertising remnant treasures which indicate it once had quite a hey-day. Like most of America’s cities, Scranton is waiting for a second wind.

Duke University Libraries

Vintage ad – circa 1966 – CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE

“Get a POP POP tingle with Wink.” – Ann-Margret in a vintage 1960s Canada Dry Wink commercial.