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Pool Hall – Lockhart, TX – Jordan Jacobs

© Jordan Jacobs

© Jordan Jacobs

Byrrh – Apéritif – Castelnaud de Gratecambe – Dordorgne, FR – Gaia Son

© Gaia Son

CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE © Wikipedia

Byrrh is an aromatised wine-based apéritif made of red wine, mistelle, and quinine. Created in 1866, it was popular as a French apéritif. With its marketing and reputation as a “hygienic drink”, Byrrh sold well in the early 20th century. It was even exported, despite the similarity of its name to “beer”, complicating sales in English- and German-language speaking regions.

Byrrh was sold in the United States until Prohibition. As of 2012, Byrrh has been reintroduced to the United States.

© Gaia Son

© Gaia Son

© Gaia Son

© Gaia Son

© Gaia Son

Union Immobiliére – Toutes Transactions – Castelnaud-de-Gratecambe, FR – Gaia Son

© Gaia Son

© Gaia Son

© Gaia Son

© Gaia Son

© Gaia Son

Save Wheat – Sugar Means Ships – Vintage U.S. Food Administration Posters

Will you help the women of France save wheat? – Vintage US Food Administration poster

Sugar Means Ships – Every spoonful – every sip – means less for a fighter – Vintage USFA poster

Fading Ad on Facade Soon To Be Revealed – East NY Blvd & Rockaway – ENY, Brooklyn

© Frank H. Jump

Apparently, several building on East NY Blvd in Brownsville/ENY are coming down. The building it is adjacent to has a large ad on the wall, which is only visible through the debris of the crumbling roof tops.

Upholstery & … – Sixth Avenue – Greenwich Village, NYC

Sunday, May 11, 2015 on the Fading Ad Walking Tour © Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Kingway Realty Corp – Kings Highway – Sheephead Bay, Brooklyn

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Thank you Ellen Levitt!

Kina-Lilet – Dordogne, FR – Gaia Son

© Gaia Son

Vintage Kina-Lillet poster

© Gaia Son

Lillet (French pronunciation: [li’le]) is a French aperitif wine from Podensac, a small village south of Bordeaux. It is a blend of 85% Bordeaux region wines (Semillon for the Blanc and for the Rosé, Merlot for the Rouge) and 15% macerated liqueurs handcrafted on site, mostly citrus liqueurs (peels of sweet oranges from Spain and Morocco and peels of bitter green oranges from Haiti) and Quinine liqueur made of Cinchona bark from Peru.

The mix is then stirred in oak vats until perfectly blended. During the ageing process, Lillet is handled as attentively as any great Bordeaux wine (undergoing fining, racking, filtering etc.). Lillet belongs to a family of aperitifs known as tonic wines because of the addition of Quinine liqueur.

In the early part of the 1970s, Maison Lillet removed KINA from the brand name calling it simply LILLET. Kina had become a generic term used by many aperitifs to reinforce its quinine content and was no longer relevant for the times. With this modification, Maison Lillet wanted their brand to stay unique and modern vis-à-vis the other players. Lillet is the name of the Family, and therefore, became the only name of the brand.

Lillet or Lilet? All these names could be found for the same product right from the beginning and as shown by the advertising objects and posters. The Lillet brothers wanted their name to be pronounced correctly: LL being normally pronounced ye and not L. – Wikipedia

Tranmissions – Ridgewood, Queens

May 12, 2015 © Frank H. Jump

Feb 27, 2015 © Frank H. Jump

Ridgewood Carpet Co. – Carpets & Linoleums – Mr. Vacuum & Singer Sewing Machines – Ridgewood, QU

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump