Fading Ad Blog Rotating Header Image

Ghost signs, ghost ads & other phantoms

Snakefly (Raphidioptera) – Amersfoort, NL – Lowlands Correspondent, Gaia Son

© Gaia Son

Snakeflies are a group of insects comprising the order Raphidioptera, consisting of about 210 extant species. Together with theMegaloptera they were formerly placed within the Neuroptera, but now these two are generally regarded as separate orders.

Snakeflies are predatory, both as adults and larvae. They can be quite common throughout temperate Europe and Asia, but in North America occur exclusively in the Western United States, namely in the Rocky Mountains and westward, including the southwestern deserts.

Adult snakeflies are characterized by having an elongate prothorax but no modification of the forelegs (as in Mantispidae). They have strong and relatively unspecialised mouthparts, and large compound eyes. Some species also have ocelli. The females typically have a long ovipositor, which they use to deposit their eggs into crevices in bark or rotting wood. The wings are similar in size, with a primitive venation pattern, and a thickened costal margin (or “pterostigma”). – Wikipedia

Use of Vintage Style Signage in Film – Gandhi (1982) – Sir Richard Attenborough (29 August 1923 – 24 August 2014)

Pietermaritzburg Train Station

Screenshot from the Academy Award winning film Gandhi (1982) by Sir Richard Attenborough

Pietermaritzburg is also famous for an incident early in the life of Mahatma Gandhi. On 7 June 1893, while Gandhi was on his way to Pretoria, a white man objected to Gandhi’s presence in a first-class carriage, and he was ordered to move to the van compartment at the end of the train. Gandhi, who had a first-class ticket, refused, and was thrown off the train at Pietermaritzburg. Shivering through the winter night in the waiting room of the station, Gandhi made the momentous decision to stay on in South Africa and fight the racial discrimination against Indians there. Out of that struggle emerged his unique version of nonviolent resistance,Satyagraha. Today, a bronze statue of Gandhi stands in Church Street, in the city centre. – Wikipedia

The centennial commemorative statue of Mahatma Gandhi in the center of downtown Pietermaritzburg, South Africa – Photo taken by Elefuntboy 2014

Johannesburg

Screenshot from the Academy Award winning film Gandhi (1982) by Sir Richard Attenborough

Screenshot from the Academy Award winning film Gandhi (1982) by Sir Richard Attenborough

Screenshot from the Academy Award winning film Gandhi (1982) by Sir Richard Attenborough

Mohandas Gandhi, centre, surrounded by workers in his law office in Johannesburg, South Africa, in 1902. (Courtesy of the Guardian UK – Photograph: AP

Wemmer Mining Company

Screenshot from the Academy Award winning film Gandhi (1982) by Sir Richard Attenborough

Screenshot from the Academy Award winning film Gandhi (1982) by Sir Richard Attenborough

Screenshot from the Academy Award winning film Gandhi (1982) by Sir Richard Attenborough

Mohandas K. Gandhi is arrested as he leads a march of Indian miners in South Africa

Date: 6 November, 1913

On his journey to South Africa in 1893, Mohandas Gandhi had first -hand experience of the discrimination faced by people of colour. His response to this was the establishment of the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) in 1894. Within three years of his arrival in South Africa, Gandhi had become a political leader, providing hope to many Indians who had no political rights under the dispensation of the time. In 1903, he founded a newspaper, the Indian Opinion, in which his ideas on passive resistance or Satyagraha were spread. Some years later, an act was introduced in which all Indians in the Transvaal were required to carry a pass. Under Gandhi’s leadership, 3000 Indians protested against the law by refusing to register for their passes. This became known as the 1906 Satyagraha Campaign.

By 1913, a tax had been imposed on all former indentured labourers, known as the Indian Relief Bill. In protest of this, Gandhi launched a passive resistance campaign, gaining the support of thousands of mine workers. While leading a march on 6 November 1913, which included 127 women, 57 children and 2037 men, Gandhi was arrested. He was released on bail, rejoined the march and was re-arrested. The Indian Relief Bill was finally scrapped.

Gandhi returned to India, and through his consistent passive opposition to British rule, led his country to independence. His philosophy on passive resistance was drawn on significantly during the fight against apartheid. The Defiance Campaign in 1952 can be seen as an example of this. – South African History Online

Martin Nicholson’s collection of South African goldmines on postcards. CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE [www.martin-nicholson.info/postcardarchive/goldmining/goldmining.htm]

Google Books

Dharasana Satyagraha & Salt Works – Mahatma Gandhi’s Non-Violence Legacy

Screenshot from the Academy Award Winning Richard Attenborough film Gandhi (1982)

Courtesy of CalPeacePower dot org

Rare Newspapers dot com

APRIL 7, 1930

THE DAY, New London, Connecticut, April 7, 1930

* Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (Mahatma) 
* Salt march (salt satyagraha) ends
* Dandi, India

The Salt Satyagraha was a campaign of non-violent protest against the British salt tax in colonial India which began with the Salt March to Dandi on March 12, 1930. It was the first act of organized opposition to British rule after Purna Swaraj, the declaration of independence by the Indian National Congress. Mahatma Gandhi led the Dandi march from his Sabarmati Ashram to Dandi, Gujarat to make salt tax free, with growing numbers of Indians joining him along the way. When Gandhi broke the salt laws in Dandi at the conclusion of the march on April 6, 1930, it sparked large scale acts of civil disobedience against the British Raj salt laws by millions of Indians.

Gandhi was arrested on May 5, 1930, just days before his planned raid on the Dharasana Salt Works. The Dandi March and the ensuing Dharasana Satyagraha drew worldwide attention to the Indian independence movement through extensive newspaper and newsreel coverage. The satyagraha against the salt tax continued for almost a year, ending with Gandhi’s release from jail and negotiations with Viceroy Lord Irwin at the Second Round Table Conference. Over 80,000 Indians were jailed as a result of the Salt Satyagraha. The campaign had a significant effect on changing world and British attitudes toward Indian independence, and caused large numbers of Indians to actively join the fight for the first time, but failed to win major concessions from the British.

The Salt Satyagraha campaign was based upon Gandhi’s principles of non-violent protest called satyagraha, which he loosely translated as “truth-force.” In early 1930 the Indian National Congress chose satyagraha as their main tactic for winning Indian independence from British rule and appointed Gandhi to organize the campaign. Gandhi chose the 1882 British Salt Act as the first target of satyagraha. The Salt March to Dandi, and the beating of hundreds of non-violent protesters in Dharasana, demonstrated the effective use of civil disobedience as a technique for fighting social and political injustice. The satyagraha teachings of Gandhi and the March to Dandi had a significant influence on American civil rights activist Martin Luther King, Jr., and his fight for civil rights for blacks and other minority groups in the 1960s.

Screenshot from the Academy Award Winning Richard Attenborough film Gandhi (1982)

Screenshot from the Academy Award Winning Richard Attenborough film Gandhi (1982)

Also see:

LILYWHITE LIES (1987) – DON’T WANNA BE ANOTHER NUMBER – WORLD AIDS DAY – Twenty-seven years later

Lilywhite Lies

Hey yo yo, How ya go?
I hear you don’t like me ‘cause I’m a homo
Heard rumours ‘round you don’t wish me well
Say I’m a devil child and goin’ to hell
You preach to crowds I’m bad and wild
Spread disease and rape your child
Say if I don’t repent it’s God’s punishment
A case of AIDS I’ll get
I say, “You wanna bet?”
You hate me, berate me
But you forget God did create me
You say it’s true, you hands’ll heal
But let me tell you preacher
You ain’t the real deal
So listen minister, hear my story reverend
Until you love me you ain’t goin’ to heaven
Ho ho

CHORUS: It’s just another case of lilywhite lies, Lilywhite holy white

Hey yo yo, what you know?
Havin’ some trouble just sayin’ no?
You read the papers?  Hear what they say?
“You’ll only catch AIDS if you’re black or you’re gay.”
So don’t worry America, you’ll live a long life
Keep your eyes shut to the pain and the strife
There are millions out there that’ll die in a year
But don’t get excited, Don’t shed a tear
Just keep livin’ your lives like it doesn’t exist
‘Til it hits you, then you’ll be pissed
Maybe too late just to pick up and run
With your daughter, your wife, your husband or son
‘Cause it’s over in Europe, it’s big in Japan
Africa’s got it and even Iran
So come on home, open your eyes,
Everyone knows a young person who dies

CHORUS: It’s just another case of lilywhite lies, Lilywhite holy white

Now if everyone you know is either scared to death or dyin’
It’s time to ACT UP, ‘cause they all killin’ you with lyin’
Like they care about your lover, they wanna find a cure
But all the money’s spent on weapons to fight a secret war
They love to watch the numbers mount
‘Cause people of color and faggots and women don’t count
When they round us up and jail us, it won’t be new news
Remember fifty years ago, Hitler did it to the Jews
So take it to the streets and write the President a letter
Denying there’s a crisis won’t make anyone better
HELP ME!

CHORUS: It’s just another case of lilywhite lies, Lilywhite holy white

They love to watch the numbers mount
Don’t wanna be a number
Don’t wanna be what they want me to be
Another number

Frank H. Jump ©1987 RoughGift Productions/BMI

written, performed & produced by Frank H. Jump

Isabel Celeste Dawson – backup vocals
Francis Grant – guitar & backup vocals
Glenn Berger – sound engineer/production

Wintery Images from Helsinki – Gaia Son

Hunter’s Lodge Motel – Restaurant & Bar – Delaware, NJ

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Enzo & Buddy © Frank H. Jump

Georg Geiling & Co. – Sektkellereien – Sparkling Wine Cellar – Bacharach, Germany – Iman R. Abdulfattah

© Iman R. Abdulfattah

Gölz’sche Weinkellerei – St. Werner – Bacharach, Germany – Iman R. Abdulfattah

© Iman R. Abdulfattah

Bacharach Besuchen – Visit Bacharach

This business was opened 111 years ago. According to one business website, this business is closed and another says it is still active.

Marbach Burgbrand – Burglay Liköre – Liquors – Bacharach, Germany – Iman R. Abdulfattah

© Iman R. Abdulfattah

© Iman R. Abdulfattah

© Iman R. Abdulfattah

 

Groliers Craft Press – L. Kehlman Co – Amarusa Paper Revisited

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Previously published on FAB: