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Gordon’s Gin – Regency Liquors – The Half Note Club – Chattanooga, TN

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

502 E MLK Blvd © Frank H. Jump

This awning was full of mold an inch deep and the smell coming out of the building of both the Half Note Club and Regency Liquors indicated they were closed for a number of years.

For decades, Ninth Street was the hub of the black community, home to black-owned retail shops, nightclubs and businesses. Bessie Smith sang there as a child and teenager, and it attracted many of biggest black entertainers such as Ella Fitzgerald, Lena Horne and Nat “King” Cole, who would stay in the Martin Hotel. Clubs like the Whole Note and The Half Note were full of blues and jazz.

East Ninth Street was renamed M.L King Boulevard in 1981. – Chattanooga Now, March 2014

According to a thread in Old Bars, Chattanooga;

The Whole Note started out as a top of the line club for R&B entertainment and the Half Note was private for the who’s who’s in African American businessmen and politicians. Charles Bryant was the owner.

Coffee Printing Company – Selma, AL

© Frank H. Jump

Bull Durham Tobacco – Uneeda Biscuit – Nabisco – Sloan’s Liniment, etc. – Birmingham, AL

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Dixie Cycle & Toy Co. – Bicycles, Toys, Lawnmower Supplies – Cook Credit Furniture © Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Sloan’s © Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Also featured in Charles Buchanan’s Fading Ads of Birmingham (History Press, 2012.

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Frank Jump, Charles Buchanan & Vincenzo Aiosa – Birmingham, AL – July 2015

Central Alabama Dry Goods Co. – Selma, AL

© Frank H. Jump

W.S. Monk – Bulletin of the National Association of Credit Men – May 1914 – Google Books

Cigars – Tobacco – Whole Ground Spices – 620 East Market – Louisville, KY

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Laclede’s Landing – Waterfront Art – Missouri Arts Council

CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE © Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

 

Sealtest – Coca-Cola – Drugs – Pharmacy – Chattanooga, TN

© Frank H. Jump

Vintage 1950s porcelain enamel sign – CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE

© Frank H. Jump

Wink – The Sassy One – Canada Dry – Sun Hotel – South Scranton, PA

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Six weeks since the Sun went down, Scranton police Officer Jill Foley drove her cruiser through a silent South Side on patrol Wednesday night looking for some sign, any sign of crime. – Denis J. O’Malley – Times Tribune, July 3, 2011

Today, I was also looking for a sign on Cedar Avenue. I found several. Not the kind of signs for which Officer Jill Foley was looking. Apparently, this once bustling late-19th-century neighborhood is now safer and quieter since this hotel has closed. Reviews on Google for this hotel are hilarious.

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The guy in the front with the Harley-Davidson claims to have done the lettering on this sign “too many years ago to remember when.” Within one block, there were many signs of a previous life on Cedar Avenue that was not so nefarious and sleazy. The South Side, as it is called in Scranton, can use a comeback. But then again, so can the North Side and the Middle Side. Scranton has some great architectural and advertising remnant treasures which indicate it once had quite a hey-day. Like most of America’s cities, Scranton is waiting for a second wind.

Duke University Libraries

Vintage ad – circa 1966 – CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE

“Get a POP POP tingle with Wink.” – Ann-Margret in a vintage 1960s Canada Dry Wink commercial.

Drop Forge Shop – University of Louisville, KY

Drop Forge Shop on south side of former Kentucky Wagon Mfg. Co., 2601 South Third Street (notice debris field in foreground) © Frank H. Jump

This is the last remaining structure of the Kentucky Wagon Manufacturing Company, which dates back to the late 1800’s. It recently became fully visible after the surrounding warehouses were demolished. The University of Louisville has plans to expand onto this 32-acre tract of land. It looks like they intend to incorporate this building into the new developments. – Diane Deaton Street – Flickr

Digital Library Collection – University of Louisville

Bull Durham Smoking Tobacco – Gold Medal Flour – Union Hotel- Ed. Dill, Prop. – Bedford, PA

© Frank H. Jump

Eventually….. Washburn & Crosby © Frank H. Jump

Bull Durham Smoking Tobacco: Standard of the World © Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Valentine Steckman, the well known hotel-keeper of Bedford, died on Tuesday at 3:35 a. m. He had been sick since January 18, 1899.

Valentine Steckman was a son of Henry and Elizabeth Steckman and was born in Monroe township, eight miles southeast of Everett, September 23, 1819. He was educated in the common schools of his native township. He learned the carpenter trade and followed that occupation until he went into the hotel business. Among the notable buildings he erected was the Barndollar M. E. church, at Everett.

He moved to Everett in 1842. In 1846 he obtained a license and conducted a hotel there until 1849, when he came to Bedford and took charge of the Union hotel. In 1856 he leased the Mengel House(now the Hotel Waverly) and conducted it for four years. Then for two years he kept a livery stable. In 1862 he purchased the Union hotel, where he lived until April 1897, when he sold that property to Edward Dill and moved into his house nearby, where he continued to entertain the traveling public.

On July 10, 1842, the deceased was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Huston, of Everett, Rev. Father Thomas Heyden officiating. To this union four children were born, namely, Mrs. James Corboy, of Bedford; Miss Alice Steckman, at home; Daniel Steckman, who was killed in the war of the rebellion at Fort Wagner July 11, 1863; and Francis Steckman, who lost his life in the battle at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864. Mrs. Steckman died in 1853.

On August 28, 1854, decedent was joined in wedlock to Miss Catharine Meloy, daughter of William Meloy, Rev. Father Heyden again officiating. Eight children were born to them, five of whom are living – Misses Ettie and Katie and Mr. James Steckman, at home; Mrs. Charles Speicer, of Lanaster; and Mrs. George A. Calhoun, of Bedford. Three children have passed into the great beyond – Philip Steckman, who died June 25, 1864; Miss Jennie Steckman, June 7, 1883; and George Steckman, February 21, 1898. The deceased was a brother of Fredrick Steckman, of Altoona; James Steckman, of Everett; Mrs. Sarah Mortimore, of Marshall county, Indiana; and Mrs. Elizabeth Morris, of Charlesville.

The funeral services were held in the St. Thomas Roman Catholic church – of which decedent was a member – yesterday morning at half past nine o’clock and were conducted by Rev. Father Denis Cashman. Interment was made in the Catholic cemetery.

In the death of Valentine Steckman, Bedford suffers the loss of one of its best citizens. He was a broad gauge, intelligent and honest man. His word was as good as his bond, and his generosity and kindness were unbounded. As a landlord Mr. Steckman was very successful. Countless patrons of his hotel have testified to the courteous treatment and excellent accommodations they received. In 1887 he concluded to dispense with the bar and since that time has not applied for a liquor license. Just before he died Mr. Steckman requested his children to extend his thanks, through the papers, to his friends and neighbors for their aid, sympathy and interest in his welfare during his last illness.

Source: The Bedford Gazette, Bedford, Pennsylvania, Friday, 22 September 1899