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Architecture

View of Toren from former DeKalb Market – August 2012

© Frank H. Jump

See Dekalb Market posting.

Freedom Tower – TriBeCa View With Watertower

© Frank H. Jump

Champlain Building – 37 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago, IL

Originally called the Powers Building – Entire floors – Offices & Shops - CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE

© Vincenzo Aiosa

Holabird & Roche have the distinction of designing two buildings in Chicago that eventually bore the same name, the Champlain… [In 1902] the building was built by a consortium of investors on a piece of property that already had a building standing on it. The architectural firm was so good at what they did that their 13-story tower opened for occupancy in December of 1902, just 8 months after demolition had begun on the old building… In 1938 after the Powers name change, the building underwent a “modernization” which stripped the first two floors of their original facades… By 1988 the School of the Art Institute itself was outgrowing their studio building at the museum and purchased the nearby Champlain for additional class and office space. – Design Slinger

Friezes & Lions & Gas – Oh My! – West 38th & 39th Streets – Midtown, NYC

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Paraco Gas & Oil © Frank H. Jump

Italian Labor Center – Fourteenth Street – NYC

© Vincenzo Aiosa

© Vincenzo Aiosa

© Vincenzo Aiosa

© Vincenzo Aiosa

© Vincenzo Aiosa

© Vincenzo Aiosa

© NYPL

© NYPL

Importers of Wholesale Sausage? – Esteve Packing Corporation – Hugh King & Co. Building 1881 – Home of MTV's Real World – 630-632 Hudson Street, NYC

© Vincenzo Aiosa

© Vincenzo Aiosa

© Vincenzo Aiosa

© Vincenzo Aiosa

According to Tracie Rozhon’s New York Times article, Habitats/632 Hudson Street; Restuffing the Sausage – published: January 23, 1994: the four-story, 8,000-square-foot building erected in 1847 between Jane and Horatio Streets by the heirs of Richard Towning.

A CAST-IRON cornice bearing the name of the produce merchant Hugh King was placed across 632 and its twin, 630 Hudson, in 1881.

The Esteve family bought the building during World War II to make candy, according to Edward V. Esteve, a Long Island lawyer. You couldn’t get torrone, a Spanish nougat, during the war, so we started making it,” he said. – NY Times

The Esteve family purchased the building during World War II with the intentions to begin producing candy. The family switched to sausage in the mid-1950’s. By the 1960’s the canned chorizo was carried all over the world. Maria Esteve closed the sausage business in 1983, but refused to sell the building, hoping to launch another business, possibly a restaurant. It wasn’t until her death in March 1993 that the family was able to sell the building.¹

Other links to 632 Hudson Street:

Hollywood Bread Building – 1747 Van Buren Street – Hollywood, FL

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Temple Israel – Scranton, PA

Temple Israel - Scranton, PA
© Frank H. Jump

Jefferson Theatre – Seventh Avenue & West 11th Street, NYC

Jefferson Theatre - NYC
© Frank H. Jump

Classic Advertecture – Towleroad

Classic Advertecture