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Downtown Brooklyn

Featured Fade – For Sale This Choice Plot – Bridge Street – Downtown Brooklyn – Vlad Iorsh

Treatments in Photoshop by FHJ – © Vlad Iorsh

New Fading DeKalb Market – Willoughby & Flatbush

© Frank H. Jump

Original artwork by Molicia Crichton

Of course, after I discover something and photograph it, it disappears. The Dekalb Market is closing after just over a year – three and a half years prior to the promise made by Urban Space, a NYC developer that organizes specialty markets. All of the vendors with whom I spoke were not happy about the situation since they had all made large out-of-pocket investments to equip their storage container kiosks.

Merchants upset by planned move  for DeKalb Market – NY Daily News – June 28, 2012

Brooklyn’s Dekalb Market Collage

CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE © Frank H. Jump

Brooklyn’s New Dekalb Market – Year Two

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

The Best Cappuccino in Town! © Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

For the best cup of coffee, some great wines and really fun food, check out this great temporary market while it lasts – before someone drops a high-rise on it. Really neat jewelry and clothes too!

  •  Inhabitat -Brooklyn’s New DeKalb Market is Made from 22 Salvaged Shipping Containers – Exclusive Photos! by Leonel Ponce, 07/25/11

Featured Fade – Lindsay Laboratories – Nevins & Schermerhorn Streets – Downtown Brooklyn – Bennett Cohen

© Bennett Cohen

© Bennett Cohen

Elsewhere on the Internet:

Downtown Brooklyn Sneaker Ad – Fulton Street Mall

© Frank H. Jump

Olde “York” Remnant – Court & Schermerhorn Streets – Downtown, Brooklyn

© Frank H. Jump

Frank H. Tyler – Apartments to Let – Albee Square, Brooklyn

© Frank H. Jump

Pomeroy Truss Company from Macy’s Window with Dead Dragonfly in Foreground

© Frank H. Jump

Russeks – Fulton Street Mall – Downtown Brooklyn

© Frank H. Jump

Russeks started out specializing in furs, but the Brooklyn branch and its Fifth Avenue counterpart soon became known for their women’s collections. These ads appeared in The New York Times pre-World War II. – Ephemeral NY