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Landmarks

Sailor’s Snug Harbor 1833 – SI

© Frank H. Jump

© Frank H. Jump

Located along the north shore of Staten Island near the ferry, Sailors Snug Harbor was originally built as a home for retired sailors, eventually becoming a cultural center for both Staten Island and the rest of New York.

The institution was founded in 1801 after Captain Robert Richard Randall’s (d. 1801) will specified that his Manhattan estate be used to start a marine hospital for “aged, decrepit and worn-out seamen.” The name Sailors Snug Harbor was suggested by Randall himself. At the time of his death, Randall’s estate, located north and east of modern-day Washington Square, was rural. By the time a protracted challenge to his will was settled, the land around the estate had changed dramatically, the city being developed around the area. Opting instead to maximize profits on the Manhattan property, Snug Harbor’s trustees relocated the proposed site to Staten Island, buying property around the harbor in 1831.

The first of Snug Harbor’s many buildings opened in 1833. Over time its initial group of 37 residents grew and more buildings were added, including the chapel, music hall, and more dormitories. Completed in 1830-31, Building C, the center building in a series of five Greek-revival style structures facing the water, is the home of the Main Hall of the Newhouse Gallery. The other four buildings were added in 1839-1841 and 1879-80, and are notable in that they exhibit a high degree of stylistic uniformity. The Chapel (1854) and its romantic Anglo-Italian style of architecture is also a landmark.  - City of NY Parks & Recreation

Jaburg Bros. 1912 – Bakery Supplies – Stapleton Waterfront, SI

© Fulton History dot com (Thomas Tryniski)

© Frank H. Jump

The building at 150 Front Street features five-to-one common brick  bond construction and a central gable-roofed monitor extending the length of the building between Front Street and the Staten Island Railway viaduct. Corbelled cornices ornament the monitor’s gable end as well as the two flanking one-story structures and the eastern portion of the southern elevation facing Thompson Street. Raised letters stating the year “1912” and the name “Jaburg Bros.” occupy the monitor peak.

Based upon the dated cornice, 1912 likely was the year the larger monitor structure at 150 Front Street was built. Both buildings appear on 1917 insurance maps. Insurance maps indicate that Jaburg Brothers manufactured bakers’ machinery, utensils, and woodenware (Sanborn 1917). A good example of early-twentieth-century industrial architecture, the 150 Front Street building has previously been determined eligible for listing on the S/NR. The eligible property consists of the entire lot. - NEW STAPLETON WATERFRONT DEVELOPMENT PLAN, FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT

© Frank H. Jump

National Baker 1915 © Google Books

  • Jaburg Bros., Inc., 94 Hudson. Tel. Walker 2600 – WHITE-ORR’S 1930 CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY–NEW YORK CITY SECTION – Bklyn Genealogy

New York Times – June 6, 1918 – CLICK FOR FULL ARTICLE

Resources:

Rare Vintage Small Sitting Cat Chocolate Candy Mold #14 Jaburg Bros – Ebay

Fiftieth Anniversay Jaburg Bros Inc – 1885 – 1939 – Ebay

Sylvan Terrace & Jumel Terrace – Morris-Jumel Mansion – The Loves of Aaron Burr: Portraits in Corsetry & Binding -Harlem, NYC

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Sylvan Terrace from Jumel Terrace © Frank H. Jump

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Sylvan Terrace looking up towards Jumel-Morris Mansion b/w West 160th & 161st and St. Nicholas & Edgecomb Avenues © Frank H. Jump

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© Frank H. Jump

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© Frank H. Jump

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© Frank H. Jump

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Morris-Jumel Mansion© Frank H. Jump

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© Frank H. Jump

New Hotel Grand Coulee – Parts (Auto) – 106 S Cedar Street – Spokane, WA

© Vincenzo Aiosa

Hotel Grand Coulee

Hotel Grand Coulee (Hotel Upton): Hotel Grand Coulee, now known as Hotel Upton in 1910. It was built during, and in response to, an unprecedented period of growth in Spokane’s history between 1900 and 1910, when it assumed its role as the regional distribution hub of the “Inland Empire.” It is a single Room Occupancy hotel (SRO). Like many other SROs that appeared in this region during this time period, the Hotel Upton was built to accommodate to the many laborers that came to Spokane to benefit from the expanding industries. “The Imperial Investment Co., headed by principle owner, manager, and Secretary Andrew Laidlaw, a mining and real estate investor, contracted prominent Spokane architect Loren L. Rand to design the building.” The Grand Coulee remains a typical SRO, however no longer operates as a Hotel. The ground floor was given over to commercial space and the upper floors for housing space. – Flickr – sexymansamson’s Photostream

The Hotel Upton is historically significant as a Single Room Occupancy hotel, or SRO, in Spokane’s central business district. It was built during, and in response to, an unprecedented period of growth in Spokane’s history between 1900 and 1910, when it assumed its role as the regional distribution hub of the “Inland Empire.” Like other SROs, which appeared on nearly every block of the central business district during the period, the Hotel Upton was built to accommodate the many itinerant laborers that flocked to Spokane to benefit from the expanding industries such as mining, agriculture, lumber and railroads. The Imperial Investment Co., headed by principle owner, manager, and secretary Andrew Laidlaw, a mining and real estate investor, contracted prominent Spokane architect Loren L. Rand to design the building. Some of Rand’s other notable local works include the First Presbyterian Church, the Marble Bank (now demolished), numerous schools including Lewis and Clark High School, and the Riverside and Main additions to the Crescent Building. The Grand Coulee, as the building is now known, retains the functional integrity of a typical SRO, with the ground floor given over to commercial space and housing on the upper floors. It is the western terminus of the West Downtown Spokane Historic Transportation Corridor, a National Register Historic District.Historic Spokane

Champlain Building – 37 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago, IL

Originally called the Powers Building – Entire floors – Offices & Shops - CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE

© Vincenzo Aiosa

Holabird & Roche have the distinction of designing two buildings in Chicago that eventually bore the same name, the Champlain… [In 1902] the building was built by a consortium of investors on a piece of property that already had a building standing on it. The architectural firm was so good at what they did that their 13-story tower opened for occupancy in December of 1902, just 8 months after demolition had begun on the old building… In 1938 after the Powers name change, the building underwent a “modernization” which stripped the first two floors of their original facades… By 1988 the School of the Art Institute itself was outgrowing their studio building at the museum and purchased the nearby Champlain for additional class and office space. – Design Slinger

D’Gekroonde Bye-Korf 1687 – The Crowned Beehive – Amerfoort, NL

© Frank H. Jump

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