Fading Ad Blog Rotating Header Image

Vintage Photography

Quaker Oats – Sandra Walker, RI – Watercolourist – Various Quaker Oats Vintage Billboards

This is the photograph © Sandra Walker, RI

This is the photograph © Sandra Walker, RI

© Sandra Walker, RI

This is the watercolor © Sandra Walker, RI

Previously posted April 17, 2007 - December 27, 2008

Duke University Digital Libraries

Duke University

Libbys Foods – Various Print & Outdoor Ads

Libbys Melrose Pate – Cosmopolitan Magazine – May 1904

The company was founded as Libby, McNeill & Libby in Chicago, Illinois, by Archibald McNeill and the brothers Arthur and Charles Libby. The business began with a canned meat product, beef in brine, or corned beef. It became well-known when it began to package the meat in a trapezoid-shaped can starting in 1875. – Wikipedia

© Wikipedia Commons

Libby’s Melrose Paté – Ebay

Duke University Digital Libraries

Non-fatting Libby’s – Quenches between meal hunger – Duke University – Street Scene cropped

Sunset Magazine – April 1904 – Vol. XII

Duke University Digital Libraries

Duke University Digital Libraries

Duke University Digital Libraries

How to Make Good Things to Eat- Gesine (Knubel) Lemcke – Libby, McNeill & Libby – CLICK FOR LINK

Mmm mmm good! Oops! Wrong slogan – Libby’s Magazine – How to Make Good Things to Eat

Blue Label Ketchup Vintage Ad – Sunset Magazine – Duke University Digital Archives – OJ Gude Advertising NY

Sunset Magazine – April 1904 – Vol. XII Page 103

Duke University – CLICK FOR LINK

Blue Label Tomato Ketchup – Duke University Libraries Catalog

Duke University Digital Libraries Catalog – circa 1898 – CLICK FOR LINK

CROPPED – Blue Label Ketchup – Times Square, NYC – Duke University

Louis Baunach – Prime Meats – New Sauerkraut – circa Early 1900s – Possibly Richmond Hill or Ridgewood, Queens

CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE © Frank H. Jump

CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE © Frank H. Jump

CLOSE-UP – CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE © Frank H. Jump

CLOSE-UP- CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE © Frank H. Jump

According to genealogy website Mocavo, A “Louis Baunach was born on September 10, 1879 and died on February, 1969 at the age of 90…. Louis’s last known place of residence was Richmond Hill, Queens County, New York.” I am not certain that this is the same Louis Baunach as in this image, which Vincenzo and I bought in a second-hand story in Fishs Eddy, NY almost two decades ago. It is also unclear as to whether or not these images were taken in Queens. Feel free to help solve this mystery.

More Old East New York: ENY Terminal Buildings & Images from Our Lady of Loreto

East New York Terminal Buildings (2002)

East New York Terminal Buildings before becoming a shelter in October 2002 © Frank H. Jump

East New York Terminal Buildings before becoming a shelter in October 2002 © Frank H. Jump

East New York Terminal Buildings before becoming a shelter in October 2002 © Frank H. Jump

East New York Terminal Buildings before becoming a shelter in October 2002 © Frank H. Jump

East New York Terminal Buildings before becoming a shelter in October 2002 © Frank H. Jump

Our Lady of Loreto – 124 Sackman Street

Our Lady of the Loreto – East NY – October 2002 © Frank H. Jump

October 2002 © Frank H. Jump

Yesterday, I was doing a search for Diana Coal Oil since I recently reposted it, and I found my image on the Our Lady of Loreto’s Photo’s of Old East New York page (Dominick Mondelli, Webmaster).  Here are some highlights from Donny’s page of old East New York filled with great fading ads and other glimpses of Brooklyn’s past.

OLL seen from Atlantic Ave & Sackman – Fletcher’s Castoria sign on bldg – Our Lady of Loreto website

Atlantic Avenue & Eastern Parkway circa 1940 before construction of the Altantic Avenue viaduct – Our Lady of Loreto website

Atlantic Ave & Eastern Pkwy west toward Rockaway Ave circa 1954 – Our Lady of Loreto website

Atlantic Avenue & Eastern Parkway today – Our Lady of Loreto website

Pietro LaBarbera Grocery mid 1930′s – 177 Rockaway Ave. – Our Lady of Loreto website

Giorgianni Pharmacy circa 1942 – 2272 Pacific St. off Easterm Pkwy – Our Lady of Loreto website

Fulton & Rockaway – Our Lady of Loreto website

The Kishke King 1711 Pitkin Ave. – Our Lady of Loreto website

Piel’s Brewery Delivery Truck – 315 Liberty Ave – Founded in 1883 by the Piel brothers – Our Lady of Loreto website

East New York Ave. & Stone Ave. 1954 before the construction of the Howard Houses – Our Lady of Loreto website

Stone Ave. & Sumpter St. 1941 – Our Lady of Loreto website

Stone Ave. & Sumpter St. 1941 – Our Lady of Loreto website

H. Fox & Co. Inc. – 416 Thatford Ave. – Makers of U-bet syrup – Our Lady of Loreto website

1930 Photo of Atlantic Ave. looking East from Williams Avenue – Our Lady of Loreto website

Cropped 1930 Photo of Atlantic Ave. looking East from Wiliams Ave. – Our Lady of Loreto website

Yellow Auto Supplies 2533 Atlantic Ave. off  Williams Avenue - Our Lady of Loreto website

Matchbook from Tex’s Pizza – Our Lady of Loreto website

Courtesy of webmaster of Lady of Loreto Church.

It Happened in Cleveland – Women's Suffrage Headquarters, 1912

Suffrage

Woman suffrage headquarters in Upper Euclid Avenue, Cleveland–A. (at extreme right) is Miss Belle Sherwin, President, National League of Women Voters; B. is Judge Florence E. Allen (holding the flag); C. is Mrs. Malcolm McBride.

Anti-Suffragists - Harris & Ewing

Historically a number of men have engaged with feminism. Philosopher Jeremy Bentham demanded equal rights for women in the eighteenth century. In 1866, philosopher John Stuart Mill (author of “The Subjection of Women”) presented a women’s petition to the British parliament; and supported an amendment to the 1867 Reform Bill. Others have lobbied and campaigned against feminism. Today, academics like Michael Flood, Michael Messner and Michael Kimmel are involved with men’s studies and pro-feminism.

Other men have campaigned against feminism. During the suffragettes‘ campaign anti-suffragists numbered 160 in 1902 in Britain. In New York, the New York State Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage was founded in 1897, and by 1908 it had over 90 members. – Wikipedia – Feminism

Skyscrapers of New York via North River – Thomas Edison Film

Pennsylvania Railroad

United Fruit Co - Library of Congress

Lehigh Valley
Stills taken from Library of Congress film archive
of Thomas Edison film [http://memory.loc.gov/mbrs/lcmp002/m2a05172.mpg].

Celluloid Comb Factory Ruins, c. 1909 – 150-152 Columbia Street – Library of Congress

Celluloid Comb Factory
Library of Congress

My buddy Robert Baptista – Colorants History.org- found this image and forwarded me some historical anecdotes pertaining to this former Brooklyn business (celluloid combs) that are reminiscent of the famous Triangle Factory Fire. Thanks Robert!

Hi Frank- I was looking at Brooklyn photos at the Library of Congress web site when I came across the attached photo with an interesting story behind it. The photo shows a celluloid comb factory at 150-152 Columbia St. that was hit by a devastating fire on Nov. 8, 1909. According to a New York Times article of Nov. 17, 1909 the fire claimed ten lives. The building had no fire escapes and iron bars on the second floor windows prevented workers from escaping.

The owner of the business, Robert Morrison, lost his son William in the fire. William was trying to rescue other workers. A despondent Robert Morrison committed suicide at his Brooklyn home on Nov. 18, 1909.

I don’t know if the building is still there. If it is, it would make a good then and now feature at your web site.

Best regards,
Robert

Google Maps
Google Maps

Get Shorpy – The 100-Year-Old Photo Blog


My buddy Julian Seery Gude, great great grandson of advertising pioneer OJ Gude, turned me on to this blog. Great vintage photos. Above are Vincenzo, 15 years old, and brother Angelo, 11 years old, baking bread for their father at 174 Salem Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts. February 1, 1917

Powered by Qumana